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The Whole Camino Portugues

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620km
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29 days
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Starting From
€2720
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The Whole Camino Portugues Map
The Camino Portugues is a pilgrimage from Lisbon in Portugal that heads north through Portugal to cross the border into Spain, finishing at Santiago de Compostela and the tomb of St James. Passing through famous Portuguese towns and cities such as Santarem, Tomar, Coimbra, and Porto, you have plenty of opportunity to enjoy the varied cultures of Portugal. The walk will take you along ancient paths, running through woodlands, farmlands, olive groves, vineyards, and historic towns.

Highlights

Vibrant Cities

The Camino Portugues is a quite route for pilgrims to walk, however it passes through some of the most vibrant cities of Portugal.  First up is Lisbon, the beginning of the Camino Portugues and also the capital of Portugal.  Take in the pastel coloured buildings of the old town, ride the iconic yellow tram, relax down on the waterfront with the Rio Tejo slowly moving by and be sure to sample a Pastel de Belém. Moving northwards you then come to the university city of Coimbra. Here you will find one of the oldest universities in Europe nestled amongst historical buildings overlooking the Rio Mondego. The student population keep the city feeling young but you can also get a real feel for the traditional with a rendition of Fado music in one of the many small bars.  Finally moving back out to the coastline and the banks of the Douro River you have the city of Porto. Wander the streets and admire the historical buildings, cross the river and sample the Port wine or just relax in one of the quirky cafes.

Portugues Architecture

Along the Camino Portuguese you will encounter many different styles of architecture.  The Age of Discovery for Portugal has left a legacy of fine architecture. Influences of the countries and cultures discovered by Portugal can be seen in the many palaces and religious buildings that where built at that time, such as the Manueline style; Sé Catedral in Lisbon.  This is not the only influence on architecture in Portugal you will find influences from earlier periods such the Moorish time, Roman and even Celtic period.

Lisbon to Santiago De Compostela
Camino Portugues
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Services

Included in this package
  • Bed & Breakfast
  • Specially Hand-Picked Accommodation
  • Our Holiday or Pilgrim Pack
  • 24/7 Customer Service
  • Virtual Face-to-Face Pre-Departure Briefing
Add-On
  • Premium Accommodation
  • Airport Pick-Up
  • Additional Nights
  • Dinners
  • Luggage Transfers from Hotel to Hotel
  • Day Tours to Local Sites of Interest
Not included
  • Flights/trains
  • Insurance
  • Drinks/Lunch

Itinerary

Day 1

LISBON (Arrival)

Located on the Atlantic Ocean coast and on the banks of the River Tejo, the western-most capital city of Europe is a great place to relax before your trip. Visitors can visit UNESCO World Heritage sites such as the Jeronimo Monastery and Belem Tower amongst other interesting architectural buildings and squares. There are so many things to see and do in Lisbon that visitors have access to a wide array of different experiences.


Day 2
40.32km

LISBON
to
VILA FRANCA DE XIRA

We recommend spending the extra time in Lisbon today to explore this wonderful city. Then, at your leisure, take the train to Vilafranca de Xira, home of a famous bullfighting festival, to spend the night and start your Camino walk from here the following day.


Day 3
19.41km

VILA FRANCA DE XIRA
to
AZAMBUJA

Leaving Vila Franca de Xira, you travel through a region where bullfighting and horse breeding are part of daily life for generations of locals. The Camino continues parallel to the Tejo River, offering tranquil riverside views across the whole section, before heading inland towards the pleasant town of Azambuja.


Day 4
33.08km

AZAMBUJA
to
SANTAREM

This walking day brings us to the highest point of this section, at 110 metres, in Santarem, which is also the final stop over of our first stretch of the Portuguese Way. This is a very enjoyable walk as half of the day is spent going through lush crop fields, fruit groves, and vineyards.


Day 5
33.66km

SANTAREM
to
GOLEGA

Leaving Santarem, we find ourselves walking along quiet country lanes as the Camino heads north-east, mostly following Rio Tejo. It passes through charming villages marked by the regional culture of campinos (cattle herders) and horse breeding life. This is a long walking day but the flat terrain makes it easy enough to complete.


Day 6
30.29km

GOLEGA
to
TOMAR

We start this day heading towards one of the country’s nicest manor houses, Finca da Cardiga. Then, we continue through the quiet hilly countryside, passing through a few scattered villages. The day finishes on Praza de la Republica in Tomar, in the heart of the old city.


Day 7
32.28km

TOMAR
to
ALVAIAZERE

Today brings a change of terrain as we go up and down along several wooded valleys, Roman roads that remain in use to this day, and farm tracks. This day is often seen as challenging but it is also one of the most rewarding when completed of this whole section.


Day 8
12.73km

ALVAIAZERE
to
ANSIAO

Leaving Alvaiazere, we start with a steep climb up the hills surrounding the town followed by a steady descent. The Camino continues up and down through crop fields and olive groves and along the mediaeval route that brings us to your destination for the evening, Ansiao.


Day 9
30.47km

ANSIAO
to
CONDEIXA A NOVA

We leave Ansiao, crossing a 17th Century bridge (the Ponte da Cal) and heading towards Netos. From here, the landscape alternates between pine and eucalyptus woods, olive groves, and small rural towns. Towards the late afternoon, we finally make our way to Condeixa a Nova.


Day 10
17.11km

CONDEIXA A NOVA
to
COIMBRA

The first half of the day runs through the countryside with lovely vineyards, olive groves, and woodlands. As we approach the university city of Coimbra, the area becomes more populated and the last climb of this section is towards alto de Cruz de Mourocos (with a total height of 190 metres) overlooking Coimbra and the Rio Mondego valley. Coimbra is a bustling, lively city, home of one of the oldest universities in Europe!


Day 11
22.86km

COIMBRA
to
MEALHADA

Today is mainly a flat walk alternating between urban areas and river valleys. The only difficulty might be the gentle climb when leaving Coimbra and the Rio Mondego valley, up to Cioga do Monte. On this stage, the Camino mostly follows an ancient Roman road (even though very little of the original remains). We end the day in Mealhada, a famous wine-growing area.


Day 12
25.19km

MEALHADA
to
AGUEDA

Leaving Mealhada, we continue to walk through pleasant vineyards with no particular difficulty, with most of the day spent on asphalt. On the way, the route runs through Avelas de Caminho, a city historically linked to the Camino. We finally reach Agueda, a town built on the banks of the Certima River.


Day 13
15.91km

AGUEDA
to
ALBERGARIA A VELHA

This short stage presents no difficulty, the high point of the day being our final destination in Albergaria A Velha. Part of the day runs through peaceful pine and eucalyptus woods, a leg of the Camino that follows the original Via Romana XVI, with a beautiful stone bridge crossing over the Rio Marnel.


Day 14
29.07km

ALBERGARIA A VELHA
to
SAO JOAO DE MADEIRA

We start this day walking along a lovely forest road and then the area becomes more urbanised as the Camino progresses further towards the North of the Beira coast and Porto. We also cross the charming town of Oliveira de Azemeis with its pretty historical centre and Matriz de Sao Miguel Church. The terrain also becomes more undulating and there is a bit of up and down across small hills, the highest point of the day culminating at 220 metres atop Sao Joao da Madeira.


Day 15
34.08km

SAO JOAO DE MADEIRA
to
PORTO

Leaving Sao Joao da Madeira, we pass through Arrifana and its blue church. Soon we find ourselves walking on the well-preserved original cobbled Roman road. We then continue downhill towards the 13th Century monastery, Mosteiro de Grijo. Heading towards Porto, feel the fresh breeze of the Atlantic coast as we get closer to the famous Port wine capital city. We approach Vila Nova de Gaia, the city facing Porto, on the other side of Rio Duero before finally entering Porto via the majestic Puente D. Luiz I.


Day 16
22.55km

PORTO
to
FAJOZES

The terrain leaving Porto is generally flat and makes the first day of walking gentle. There are numerous ancient churches along the Camino and nearby, such as the 12th Century monastery, Mosteiro Leca do Balio, built on the exact spot a Roman temple dedicated to the god Jupiter once stood.


Day 17
11.9km

FAJOZES
to
ARCOS

From Fajozes, the Camino starts heading north-east, gradually moving away from the coastline. A little bit outside Fajozes the route crosses an incredible mediaeval bridge, Dom Zameiro. The first woodlands of this section also appear here, with pine and eucalyptus trees providing shade from the sun.


Day 18
20.56km

ARCOS
to
BARCELOS

Day 4 is a relatively short walk as the path leaves Arcos. Gentle woodland and charming villages alternate along the route, and there’s the option to visit the Chapel of Santa de Franqueira, which provides panoramic hilltop views. Further on, you cross another well-preserved mediaeval bridge and soon arrive in the main square at the lively market town of Barcelos, complete with Renaissance fountain and one of the largest markets in Europe.


Day 19
33.52km

BARCELOS
to
PONTE DE LIMA

As we leave Barcelos, we start to feel Galicia approaching. The landscape begins to change, becoming both hillier and greener, offering pastoral views all day. This day is probably the most challenging section of this route as there aren’t many towns or villages to stop at, and there are a few steep inclines. However, it’s worth it for the scenery alone.


Day 20
37.44km

PONTE DE LIMA
to
TUI

Leaving Ponte de Lima you will be struck by the beautiful scenery on your way to Tui. Passing through vineyards and forest paths, today is a restful day of introspection for the soul. Arriving at the port in Tui, treat yourself to a glass of wine and some seafood!


Day 21
16.99km

TUI
to
O PORRINO

From the long-standing port of Tui, the Camino winds its way up to the old town, following the so-called Camino da Barca. Then, through the Tunel das Monxas, the Camino enters a very steep section and leads us to the historic bridge of San Telmo. From there, travelling over less strenuous terrain, we come to the town of O Porrino.


Day 22
24.43km

O PORRINO
to
ARCADE

The terrain becomes easier to navigate as we cross the Louro Valley. Keeping the valley to the east, after a gentle climb you arrive at the chapel of Santiaguino de Antas – a pleasant place to take a rest. We now enter a wide expanse of woodland. Surrounded by pine trees, the Camino starts its descent through the hamlet of Sete Fontes and arrives in Arcade.


Day 23
11.55km

ARCADE
to
PONTEVEDRA

From here you will cross a Romanesque bridge where Napoleon was defeated by the Spanish during the War of Independence. Arriving into Pontevedra, you will head through the narrow streets before reaching the 13th Century Church of Santa Maria. Of interest to pilgrims is also the Capela da Peregrina which, although it appears round, is actually in the shape of a scallop shell.


Day 24
21.16km

PONTEVEDRA
to
CALDAS DE REIS

Passing chestnut groves, the Camino leaves Pontevedra and runs parallel to the railway for a while. After passing through the hamlet of Ponte Cabras, we encounter the rectory of Santa Maria de Alba, tucked away among pine and eucalyptus trees. Emerging from the dense woods of Lombo da Maceira, you’ll see a statue of St James, his staff pointing the way to proceed. Passing the lovely village of Tibo, with its fountain, public washing place and stone cross, brings us to Caldas de Reis.


Day 25
18.7km

CALDAS DE REIS
to
PADRON

Exiting the town, we take a bridge over the River Umia that leads us to a fountain of hot spring water that has lent the town its name since Roman times. Entering the woods once more, the Camino makes its way gently uphill to the hamlet of Santa Marina. Going downhill, we cross the river Fontenlo. Finally, we catch up again with the river as we arrive in Padron. Padron is famous for being the first land sighted by the ship bearing the body of St James.


Day 26
24.73km

PADRON
to
SANTIAGO DE COMPOSTELA

The Camino passes through many small hamlets before arriving at the Baroque sanctuary of A Esclavitude. On a hilltop to the left stands the mysterious ruins of the hillfort Castro Lupario. A few kilometres later, we come to the oldest wayside crossing in Galicia. As we near Agro dos Monteiros, it’s now possible to see the spires of the cathedral in Santiago. Finally, the Camino passes by the ruins of a castle known as A Rocha Vella, before entering the city of the Apostle.


Day 27

SANTIAGO DE COMPOSTELA

After breakfast, we bid you farewell. If you wish to stay in the area, we recommend that you: – Take your time and visit the magnificent historic centre of Santiago. – Continue with us along the wild Camino Fisterra (Finisterre Way), and stay overnight at the hotel in the lighthouse! – Or take a bus to Fisterra to visit the unspoilt sandy coves and beaches of the west coast. With very few tourists, you are guaranteed a very special experience. Buses depart from Santiago Bus Station at 9am and 10am. Buses return to Santiago at 4:45pm and 7pm. The journey takes 3 hours.


The Whole Camino Portugues Elevation


How to Get There

How to Get There

Getting to Lisbon city centre, Portugal

It is best to fly to Lisbon. Virtually every company flies to Lisbon. More info.

Fly into Lisbon

From Lisbon Airport several urban bus routes can bring you to the city centre. There are also shuttle buses.

Getting home from Santiago de Compostela, Spain

Fly from Santiago de Compostela

Shuttle buses from Santiago city centre to the airport (20mins).



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