Via Francigena

‘All roads lead to Rome’

During the Middle Ages, when pilgrimages to holy places in Europe reached its height, alongside the popular Camino de Santiago was the Via Francigena, The Way through France.

This route was transcribed in the 10th Century by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Sigeric the Serious when he was returning to Canterbury after being ordained a Cardinal by Pope John XV.  The Via Francigena is the main pilgrimage route to Rome from France, though its traditional starting point is Canterbury in England.  You can learn more about the history of the Via Francigena on our blog.

We at Follow the Camino would recommend this route as an alternative to the Camino de Santiago if you are looking for more of a challenge.  As this route is not as busy as the Camino de Santiago it is not as well waymarked nor does it have the frequency of facilities along the route and so will require more planning ahead of your days walking.

Nonetheless, this route is growing in popularity, particularly with pilgrims who have completed the Camino de Santiago and are looking to complete a pilgrimage on foot to Rome, the home of the Vatican as well as the tombs of Saints Peter and Paul.  This route has also been recognised by the Council of Europe and designated a Major Cultural Route in 2004.

Our sister company One Foot Abroad has developed manageable sections of this walk from Canterbury to Rome.  Along the route, they have sourced the finest local accommodation and you will also have the opportunity to soak up the local culture whilst sampling the various regions culinary delights: Via Francigena.

1,900km

of walking trails

180 +

days of walking

16

different sections

Choose Individual Sections

For those seeking a more challenging trek through the Italian countryside, this stretch of the Via Francigena is the perfect fit. While enjoying the rolling hills, scenic woods, and weathered roads, you will be exposed to a rich cultural history as well as delicious local cuisine and wines.
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Beginning in Aulla and finishing in Lucca, the twelfth section of Via Francigena features magnificent sights to see such as the Abbey of Saint Peter and the Church of Saint Michael, the Cathedral of Saints Peter and Francis, towers and castles, and an interesting archaeological site at Luni.
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Stretching from Lucca to Siena, this portion of the Via Francigena takes you along roadsides, over various bridges, rolling hills, and numerous earth tracks. Throughout the entire walk, you will be surrounded by beautiful fields, lush woods and over streams in the stunning Italian countryside.
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Beginning in the city of Siena, this section of Via Francigena visits the Castello Bibbiano in Buonconvento, the Palazzo Chigi in San Quirico d’Orcia and Torre Alfina in Acquapendente. Rolling hills and valleys offer numerous opportunities to capture the Italian countryside.
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With five days and four nights to enjoy the Italian countryside, this tour allows you to experience traditional Italy. At every stop, you can enjoy the local wine, cuisine, and rich cultural practices. After touring the countryside, the tour ends in Viterbo, home of the Papal Palace.
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Stretching from Canterbury, England to Rome, Italy this is easily the longest route we operate. The final section of the Via Francigena takes you from the charming city of Viterbo through the Italian countryside to Rome. Standing in the Vatican City is truly the pinnacle of this adventure.
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