Camino Portugues from Porto to Tui

The Camino Portugues became an extremely popular route when the country gained its independence – way back in the 12th Century. Today, some believe it to be the route richest in cultural and architectural curiosities. The Camino Portugues starts in Lisbon and crosses the Alentejo and the central and northern regions of Portugal. It moves into Spain then, to Tui, and continues north through Galicia and on to Santiago de Compostela.

Porto
Porto to Tui
sry 8 days
sry 7 nights
sry 127.7km
sry
sry
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
Get Itinerary
From
€769
FREE CO 2 This trip creates 0.2375 tonne(s) of CO2, we offset it for free

Trip Highlights

Porto

A vibrant coastal city in the north of Portugal, Porto has much to offer and well worth an extra night to have the time to fully explore the city. Meander through the medieval streets of the Ribeira District, take a relaxing boat ride on the Douro river or cross one of the many bridges to visit the southern side of the river, Vila Nova de Gaia where the port wine houses are located, offering tastings and tours of their cellars.

Barcelos

This delightful medieval town is perched on a hill above the Cavado River. Here you will find the oldest and largest outdoor market held every Thursday selling not only food, but hand woven linens and local pottery. One particular piece of pottery that you will see everywhere is the rooster of Barcelos. The legend goes that a dead chicken came back to life on the dinner table of the judge after he wrongly condemned a pilgrim to hang. Through the intervention then of St James despite having been hung the man was still alive when the judge went to the gallows upon witnessing the miracle of the rooster. The rooster is now a widely recognised symbol of Portugal.

Ponte de Lima Bridge

Ponte de Lima is one of the oldest towns of Portugal and here the Camino crosses the Ponte de Lima Bridge, which the town name derives from. This bridge supposedly marks the spot where the Romans crossed the river. The legend goes that the troops wouldn’t cross the river as they thought it was the river of forgetfulness, so one of the Generals crossed the river and then called each of the soldiers across by name dispelling the myth. On the river bank you can today see 24 wooden soldiers waiting to be called across.

Itinerary

Day 1

Porto
(Arrival)

The entire old city of Porto became a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1996 and there’s plenty going on here. Set on the bank of the Douro River near the Atlantic Ocean, the city is perhaps best known internationally for its famous Port wine. A wine that goes down very well on the countless terraces and restaurants in Porto!

Day 2
22km

Porto
to
Fajozes

The terrain leaving Porto is generally flat and makes the first day of walking a gentle one. There are numerous ancient churches along the Camino and nearby, such as the 12th Century monastery, Mosteiro Leca do Balio, built on the exact spot a Roman temple dedicated to the god Jupiter once stood.

Day 3
11km

Fajozes
to
Arcos

From Fajolez the Camino starts heading northeast, gradually moving away from the coastline. A little bit outside Fajolez the route crosses an incredible medieval bridge, Dom Zameiro. The first woodlands of this section also appear here, with pine and eucalyptus trees providing shade from the sun.

Day 4
20km

Arcos
to
Barcelos

Day 4 is a relatively short walk asthe path leaves Arcos to reach the lively market town of Barcelos. Gently undulated woodland and charming villages alternate along the route, and there’s the option to visit the Chapel of Santa de Franqueira, which provides panoramic views from the top of the hill. Further on, you cross another well-preserved medieval bridge and soon arrive in the main square at Barcelos, complete with Renaissance fountain and one of the largest markets in Europe.

Day 5
32km

Barcelos
to
Ponte de Lima

As we leave Barcelos, we start to feel Galicia approaching. The landscape begins to change, becoming both hillier and greener, offering good views all day long. This day is probably the hardest section of this route as there aren’t so many towns or villages along to stop at, and there are a few steep parts, but it’s worth it for the scenery alone.

Day 6
18km

Ponte de Lima
to
Sao Pedro de Rubiaes

Similar to the previous day, there is a good deal of ascent today along the Camino, with its highest point at Alto da Portela Grande (alt. 410m). There are also numerous chapels and wayside crosses where pilgrims to Santiago traditionally place stones to mark their passage. Today you will be collected in Rubiaes and spend the night back in Ponte de Lima. We will also transfer you back to start the walk the following day to here.

Day 7
20km

Sao Pedro de Rubiaes
to
Tui

Today is a special day as we start the walk in Portugal, and end up in Galicia, Spain! The landscape here is classic Galicia: green and hilly. So it’s no surprise the trail start by walking down towards Rio Coura before ascending into Alto Sao Bento da Porta Aberta. Then, another steep descent into Fontoura before continuing towards Rio Minho, the natural and modern border between Spain and Portugal. Once here you can head towards Tui – the last stop over of this section.

Day 8

Tui

After breakfast, we bid you farewell.

Section 1

Porto
to
Fajozes

The entire old city of Porto became a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1996 and there’s plenty going on here. Set on the bank of the Douro River near the Atlantic Ocean, the city is perhaps best known internationally for its famous Port wine. A wine that goes down very well on the countless terraces and restaurants in Porto!

Section 2

Fajozes
to
Arcos

The terrain leaving Porto is generally flat and makes the first day of walking a gentle one. There are numerous ancient churches along the Camino and nearby, such as the 12th Century monastery, Mosteiro Leca do Balio, built on the exact spot a Roman temple dedicated to the god Jupiter once stood.

Section 3

Arcos
to
Barcelos

From Fajolez the Camino starts heading northeast, gradually moving away from the coastline. A little bit outside Fajolez the route crosses an incredible medieval bridge, Dom Zameiro. The first woodlands of this section also appear here, with pine and eucalyptus trees providing shade from the sun.

Section 4

Barcelos
to
Ponte de Lima

Day 4 is a relatively short walk asthe path leaves Arcos to reach the lively market town of Barcelos. Gently undulated woodland and charming villages alternate along the route, and there’s the option to visit the Chapel of Santa de Franqueira, which provides panoramic views from the top of the hill. Further on, you cross another well-preserved medieval bridge and soon arrive in the main square at Barcelos, complete with Renaissance fountain and one of the largest markets in Europe.

Section 5

Ponte de Lima
to
Sao Pedro de Rubiaes

As we leave Barcelos, we start to feel Galicia approaching. The landscape begins to change, becoming both hillier and greener, offering good views all day long. This day is probably the hardest section of this route as there aren’t so many towns or villages along to stop at, and there are a few steep parts, but it’s worth it for the scenery alone.

Section 6

Sao Pedro de Rubiaes
to
Tui

Similar to the previous day, there is a good deal of ascent today along the Camino, with its highest point at Alto da Portela Grande (alt. 410m). There are also numerous chapels and wayside crosses where pilgrims to Santiago traditionally place stones to mark their passage. Today you will be collected in Rubiaes and spend the night back in Ponte de Lima. We will also transfer you back to start the walk the following day to here.

Camino Portugues from Porto to Tui

Fly in Icon

Fly In

Option 1 – Porto
Porto airport with British Airways, Ryanair or Easyjet (can book return flights).

Option 2 – Santiago de Compostela
Santiago de Compostela airport with Aer Lingus or Ryanair.

Option 3 – Vigo
Vigo Airport with Ryanair and Iberia/BA fly direct to Vigo from the UK.



Getting Home Icon

Starting Point

1 – From Porto Airport to Porto city centre, From Porto Airport to Porto city centre, take either the Subway, linea violete, either an urban bus. Regular departures all day long.

2- From Vigo Airport, bus to Vigo bus station. Then, bus to Porto city centre (Approx. 1hr), 4 departures a day on weekdays. Bus Timetable.



Getting Home Icon

Getting Home

To Vigo Airport: Bus from Tui to Vigo bus station, regular departures (Approx. 30 min). Then urban bus (C9a route) to Vigo Airport (Approx. 20 min).

To Porto Airport: Bus from Tui to Vigo bus station, regular departures (Approx. 30). Bus Timetable.  Then direct bus to Porto Airport (Approx. 45min). Several departures a day. Bus timetable.



Our Great Service

Included

  • Great mix of comfortable accommodation in 2-3* hotels or equivalent
  • Bed & Breakfast
  • Luggage transfers from hotel to hotel
  • Dinners
  • 24/7 Customer Service
  • Our Holiday/ Pilgrim Pack

Add on

  • Premium Accommodation
  • Airport Pick-up
  • Additional Night
  • Day Tours Available

Not Included

  • Flights/train
  • Insurance
  • Drinks/Lunch

“From start to finish, Follow the Camino organised our trip with great attention to detail, which left us with more time to enjoy our adventure... they’re the ultimate professionals! ” Read more.
Andrea Smith, Journalist – Ireland

“Our charity Camino trip was made special by the great accommodation organised by Follow the Camino. This played a big part in everyone mixing so well and making it a very special Camino experience.” Read more.
Ann Tracey, Fundraiser & Co-ordinator at Gary Kelly Cancer Support – Ireland.

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Tim Begbie – Australia

“Follow The Camino did a fantastic job organising our fundraising trip to the Camino de Santiago. The organisation was of excellent quality and all of our 28 travellers had a great time...” Read more.
Frances Black, Senator & CEO of The Rise Foundation – Ireland

“All went like clockwork, including the pick up at the airport, and the luggage drop to the various accommodations. Totally recommend the Follow The Camino crew.” Read more.
John Dillon, Pilgrim – Ireland.

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Jamie and Flo McIvor – UK

“Our team leader Geraldine O’Callaghan was fantastic – pretty, bubbly, tireless – efficient and very kind. Arriving at the great cathedral of Santiago was an exhilarating, emotional finale to a completely mad week.” Read more.
Joan Flynn, retired – Ireland

“Thank you for helping us plan our journey in Spain. What a wonderful time we had trekking through the countryside. The places we stayed were wonderful!
We LOVED our trip!” Read more.
Georgia Meckes – USA

“Thank you Umberto and the Follow the Camino crew. It was an absolute pleasure to have you make our arrangements, and support us so magnificently along the way, in our efforts to raise awareness for Well Ways. You are all fabulous!" Read more.
Cheryl McInnes, Well Ways Mental Health Charity, Australia

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